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vote on something then. the senate could also pass it and signed into law. gregg: right. >> everyone is talking about there is not enough time. this is not true. congress can do whatever it wants. if they agree, the two parties agree congress can pass things very quickly the trick is getting both sides to agree. gregg: it is always small ball and it is never really significant. which shows an utter lack of courage. and the american people, you know, feel that way too about their representatives. put up on the "gallup poll." "gallup poll", likelihood of averting the fiscal cliff. there you see, susan, people are losing faith. i'm actually surprised that they haven't lost all faith. >> actually i was going to say the same thing. i think that number is pretty surprising. i would think it is much higher at this point. perhaps the public is getting used to this kind of game they play chicken and at the last second they come up with a deal. remember august 2011, we thought the nation was running out of money, we would hit the debt ceiling, government would partially shut down, literally at
of connecticut a similar law to the one adopted here banning assault weapons. this has been a heroin, terrific week in the state of connecticut, culminating in today's moment of silence at 9:30. the end of the week and i spent the better part of the time meeting with first responders, families, going to funerals and wakes and speaking with ordinary people of newtown and the state of connecticut. the refrain i have heard over and over again from newtown and connecticut and all the run the country is you need to do something about the guns. the nra statement today is sadly and shamefully inadequate, calling for more guns and rejecting real action against gun violence. at a defining a historic moment for our nation demanding courageous leadership, the nra has declined to step forward as a credible and constructive partner. the proposal for more armed guards in schools may be helpful in some instances, but it falls short of the strong, serious comprehensive action needed to stop the kind of horrific tragedy that occurred last week. many police that spoke to me on that day when we take a said that
families who signed up to adopt. this new law was named after a russian baby that died in the custody of his american adoptive parents. he was neglected. but it is really believe that the reason for this law was another law that was just passed in washington, so it is a response to the american law punishes human rights violators in russia. it was sparked by the death of a russian lawyer who died died in jail investigating a fraud case at the request of americans in russia. it singles out dozens of russians that police believe are connected to that case. they can't travel to the united states and their assets are frozen. russia has been defiant in this case. it is even launching a posthumous price for the new law and russian voices speaking of saying it's not fair to penalize children. having adopted 60,000 over last two decades, and as you mentioned, there are several dozen cases right now that are pending. several dozen russian children who are in the final stages of this adoption process. those who should be coming to the united states very soon. it is not clear what's going to hap
with the law, secretary clinton ordered this review to determine exactly what happened in benghazi. that is how we can learn and improve. i want to convey our appreciation to ambassador pickering, admiral mullen and 13. -- their team. in the hours and days after the terrorist attacks, at the secretary's direction, which took immediate steps to protect people and our post. we launched a worldwide review of the overall security posture. interagency teams give particular scrutiny to high threat posed. the pentagon agreed to dispatch additional marines to post around the world. we asked congress for funds to hire new diplomatic security personnel. we're updating our diplomat procedures to increase the number of experienced and well- trained staffs serving at those posts. tom and i will be discussing all this work and more with congress tomorrow. for now, let me make one other point. i have been a proud member of the foreign service for more than 30 years. i've had the honor of serving as a chief of mission overseas. i know that diplomacy by its very nature must sometimes be practiced in dangerous p
steps. but in 10 days, we face a deadline. in 10 days, under current law, tax rates are scheduled to rise on most americans. and even though democrats and republicans are arguing about whether those rates should go up for the wealthiest individuals, all of us, every single one of us, agrees that tax rates should not go up for the other 98% of americans, which includes 97% of small businesses. every member of congress believes that. every democrat. every republican. so there is absolutely no reason not to protect these americans from a tax hike. but the very least, let us agree right now on what we already agree on. let us get that done. i just spoke to speaker boehner and met with senator reid. i have asked congress to work on a package that prevents a tax hike on middle-class americans, protect unemployment insurance for 2 million americans, and lays the groundwork for further work on growth and deficit reduction. that is an achievable goal. that can get done in 10 days. once this legislation is agreed to, i expect democrats and republicans to get back to washington and have it p
like as prescribed by law that were kind of these catchalls that again opened the door to future abuse or limits on citizenship or on citizen rights. >> so rights were articulated but not guaranteed? >> rights were articulated but not guaranteed, and actually open to constraint and to limitations through future legislation. overall, the system didn't change dramatically. you still had a very highly centralized form of government, still very, very presidential, although it is theoretically a mixed system. it still leaves most of the power in the president's hands. and so in terms of the structure of government institutions and checks and balances, there hasn't been a whole lot new introduced. in terms of the process, i think this is where it has taken a bad situation, ordinary controversies, what might have been considered ordinary controversies, and actually made the situation much worse because at each stage the process was fundamentally flawed and only became more so over time. and we can get into details but i don't want to dominate. >> okay. so if i understand you correctly, you're
's a law passed that ensures 98% of americans know their taxes are not going to go up in just under two weeks. he also wants to make sure that 2 million americans who would otherwise lose their unemployment benefits if we went over the fiscal cliff would be able to keep those benefits. and finally he says, look, we can take a look at the longer term proposals, the larger reform at a later point. just lay the ground work at this point. we also know before the president left, he talked by phone with house speaker john boehner. he met in person with harry reid, although what the private happened, we don't know. but publicly things sound a lot like they have for the past few weeks. take a listen. >> every member of congress believes that, every democrat, every republican. so there is absolutely no rea n reason, none, not to protect these americans from a tax hike. at the very least, let's agree right now what we already agree on. let's get that done. >> what the president has offered so far simply won't do anything to solve our spending problem and begin to address our nation's crippling d
of law committee for the ocean. it is said that geography is one of the most important factors because it is the most permanent. we saw the arctic icecap drop and it appears to be opening more this session. what does this trend mean in a generation for russia and canada? >> i did go to zero chapters to it in the book. he is very provocative. in the middle of roberto they predicted china who was our ally would become our adversary geographically. also he said united europe could be a competitor for the united states. with the arctic icecap, if the arctic was open for shipping and a friend would sail the northwest passage up green land and across canada that shipping in the northern arctic that could provide alternative routes that is somewhat less of an emphasis of the indian ocean. to bring russia closer to america fundamentally. it would make canada significant you have shale guest, the tar sand and the hydropower resources with open arctic it would be that much more significant. >> i would like to offer a quick comment. to go through another level off from the decade. but with the ch
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
trillion over ten years. here we are today, december 19, and these law changes which i referenced earlier, the end of the bush era tax cuts, the dreaded sequester, across the board cuts of $1.2 trillion in spending will begin to take effect the first of next year. the good news is the white house and republicans have been trading proposals and at least yesterday appeared to be moving closer together. i would have much preferred that they would be talking about a bigger package than they've discussed but nonetheless to reach a package that would resolve some of these issues would be an important step forward and i think help promote certainty that would be important to our economy. on the revenue side of the equation, i just want to remind you what it's taken in the past to balance the budget. we hear talk on average revenue is in the 18% of g.d.p. range n. getting back to average you will should be sufficient. the problem with that is we have never balanced the budget in the last 50 years based on 18% of g.d.p. in revenue. balancedtimes we've going back to 1969, you can see that revenue h
shootings, a familiar american policy-making consensus called for federal gun-control laws. more precisely, they want congress to pass the ban on big, dramatic-looking assault-type weapons that existed from 1994 until the law sun-setted in 2004. government, for the past 80 years, or so, has seen its purpose as mainly to respond to society's failures the moment they occur or whenever they are imagined. adam lanza killed with guns so modern, policy-making logic posits that government must pass a law. whether that law will accomplish its goal is irrelevant. policy-making has become an activity that supports the genetic and financial needs of policymakers and their follower tribes. the community's role, we've lately learned, is to provide revenue. where are we going with that? >> i think he started off in a legitimate direction where he talked about how much of the legislation is done with deadlines and during lame-duck sessions. we're responsive as opposed to getting proactive. i get where he's coming from with respect to failures with the assault weapons ban in 1994. if you had a ban prior t
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11